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Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia [Maiden & Betche] Cheel)



Interactions

Tea tree oil/Drug Interactions:
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Multiple studies have reported the antimicrobial effects of tea tree oil (17; 3; 4; 18; 5; 20; 21; 22; 23; 25; 26; 27; 28). Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with antibiotics.
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: The antifungal effects of tea tree oil have been reported in multiple studies (6; 12; 90; 91; 15; 92; 28; 93). Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with other antifungal agents.
  • AntihelminthicsAntihelminthics: Theoretically, tea tree oil may increase the effects of antihelminthics.
  • AntihistaminesAntihistamines: Limited human research suggests that tea tree oil may reduce histamine-induced skin inflammation (62). Therefore, tea tree oil may increase the effects of antihistamines.
  • Anti inflammatory agentsAnti inflammatory agents: Tea tree oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may interfere with anti-inflammatory agents (94; 2; 5; 95).
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: Tea tree oil has been shown to have anti-cancer effects and may theoretically interfere with antineoplastic agents (96). Although tea tree oil is not recommended for oral consumption, it should be noted that neutropenia has been reported following the ingestion of tea tree oil (52). Therefore, oral tea tree oil should be avoided in patients taking antineoplastic agents that may cause low white blood cells.
  • AntiparasiticsAntiparasitics: Tea tree oil may increase the effects of some antiparasitics. Research suggests that tea tree oil may help treat parasitic mites, including demodex (97; 98) and lice (99; 100; 101; 93). Theoretically, tea tree oil may increase the effects of antihelminthics.
  • Cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substratesCytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates: Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates.
  • Cytochrome P450 metabolized agentsCytochrome P450 metabolized agents: Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with cytochrome P450 metabolized agents (102).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Limited human research suggests that tea tree oil may reduce histamine-induced skin inflammation (62).
  • Insect repellantsInsect repellants: Tea tree oil has been shown to possess insecticidal properties and may interfere with insect repellants (93).
  • Topical drying agentsTopical drying agents: Topical tea tree oil preparations may result in drying of the skin and may act additively with other agents, such as tretinoin (Retin-Aź, Renovaź).
  • VancomycinVancomycin: Time to kill studies found antagonism between vancomycin and tea tree oil (103).

Tea tree oil/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Multiple studies have reported the antimicrobial effects of tea tree oil (17; 3; 4; 18; 5; 20; 21; 22; 23; 25; 26; 27; 28). Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with other antibacterial agents.
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: The antifungal effects of tea tree oil have been reported in multiple studies (6; 12; 90; 91; 15; 92; 28; 93). Therefore, tea tree oil may theoretically interfere with other antifungal agents.
  • AntihelminthicsAntihelminthics: Theoretically, tea tree oil may increase the effects of antihelminthics.
  • AntihistaminesAntihistamines: Limited human research suggests that tea tree oil may reduce histamine-induced skin inflammation (62). Therefore, tea tree oil may increase the effects of antihistamines.
  • Anti inflammatory herbsAnti inflammatory herbs: Tea tree oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may interfere with anti-inflammatory agents (94; 2; 5; 95).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Tea tree oil has been shown to have anti-cancer effects and may theoretically interfere with antineoplastic agents (96). Although tea tree oil is not recommended for oral consumption, it should be noted that neutropenia has been reported following the ingestion of tea tree oil (52). Therefore, oral tea tree oil should be avoided in patients taking antineoplastic agents that may cause low white blood cells.
  • AntiparasiticsAntiparasitics: Tea tree oil may increase the effects of some antiparasitics. Research suggests that tea tree oil may help treat parasitic mites, including demodex (97; 98) and lice (99; 100; 101; 93).
  • Cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substratesCytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates: Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates.
  • Cytochrome P450 metabolized herbs and supplementsCytochrome P450 metabolized herbs and supplements: Theoretically, tea tree oil may interfere with cytochrome P450 metabolized herbs or supplements (102).
  • ImmunostimulantsImmunostimulants: Limited human research suggests that tea tree oil may reduce histamine-induced skin inflammation (62).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Limited human research suggests that tea tree oil may reduce histamine-induced skin inflammation (62).
  • Insect repellantsInsect repellants: Tea tree oil has been shown to possess insecticidal properties and may interfere with insect repellants (93).

Tea tree oil/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Tea tree oil/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood cell countsBlood cell counts: A 60 year-old male who had taken tea tree oil orally 3-4 times previously ingested one-half teaspoonful of tea tree oil and developed a red rash over his entire body and feelings of malaise one day later (52). The rash dissipated after two days and was replaced by a petechial rash in the same areas. One week later, the patient developed marked neutropenia, which resolved after an additional 10 days.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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