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Dill (Anethum graveolens)



Interactions

Dill/Drug Interactions:
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Based on in vitro study, dill weed oil and dill seed oil may exhibit bactericidal effects against various bacteria (12; 47; 48; 49; 50; 51; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: Based on animal study, administration of dill extract may result in significant reductions in glucose (19; 5).
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: Based on in vitro research, dill may have antimicrobial effects against various fungi including Candida albicans, Penicillium islandicum, and Aspergillus flavus (53; 57; 55; 58; 59; 56).
  • Anti-inflammatory agentsAnti-inflammatory agents: Based on in vitro research, dill extract may possess anti-inflammatory activity by inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production (60).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Based on animal and human study, dill extract may have dose-dependent cholesterol-lowering effects (1). However, in one clinical study, dill raised triglycerides (2).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Based on in vitro study, dill apiol, an alkoxy derivative found in dill, may alter DNA in human hepatoma cells (25). Based on in vitro study, the presence of antiproliferative polyacetylenes in Anethum graveolens root has been suggested (61).
  • CNS depressantsCNS depressants: Based on animal study, the dill constituent carvone may cause depressant effects, such as a decrease in the response to touch and ambulation, and an increase in sedation, palpebral ptosis, and antinociceptive effects (3).
  • Cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substratesCytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates: Based on in vitro research, dill apiol upregulated CYP3A4 expression and inhibited its activity (62; 63).
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: Based on animal study, extracts of Anethum graveolens L. seed may result in a reduction in the acidity and total acid content of gastric juice (7).
  • InsecticidesInsecticides: Dill oil has shown insecticidal effects against various insects, including Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus, Callosobruchus chinensis, and Lucilia sericata (64; 65; 66; 67).
  • Thyroid hormonesThyroid hormones: In animal study, an extract of Anethum graveolens L. reversed the dexamethasone-induced decrease in thyroid hormones (5).

Dill/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Based on in vitro study, dill weed oil and dill seed oil may exhibit bactericidal effects against various bacteria (12; 47; 48; 49; 50; 51; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56).
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: Based on in vitro research, dill may have antimicrobial effects against various fungi, including Candida albicans, Penicillium islandicum, and Aspergillus flavus (53; 57; 55; 58; 59; 56).
  • Anti-inflammatory herbsAnti-inflammatory herbs: Based on in vitro research, dill extract may possess anti-inflammatory activity by inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production (60).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Based on animal and human studies, dill extract may have dose-dependent cholesterol-lowering effects (1). However, in one clinical study, dill raised triglycerides (2).
  • Antimalarial herbs and supplementsAntimalarial herbs and supplements: Based on animal research, dill apiol may have synergistic antimalarial effects with the limonoid gedunin (68).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Based on in vitro study, dill apiol, an alkoxy derivative found in dill, may alter DNA in human hepatoma cells (25). Based on in vitro study, the presence of antiproliferative polyacetylenes has been suggested in Anethum graveolens root (61).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: Based on in vitro and animal study, dill extract may display antioxidant properties (69; 70; 71; 5).
  • Cytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substratesCytochrome P450 3A(4,5,7) substrates: Based on in vitro research, dill apiol upregulated CYP3A4 expression and inhibited its activity (62; 63).
  • Gastrointestinal herbs and supplementsGastrointestinal herbs and supplements: Based on animal study, extracts of Anethum graveolens L. seed may result in a reduction in the acidity and total acid content of gastric juice (7).
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Based on animal study, administration of dill extract may result in significant reductions in glucose (19; 5).
  • InsecticidesInsecticides: Dill oil has shown insecticidal effects against various insects, including Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus, Callosobruchus chinensis, and Lucilia sericata (64; 65; 66; 67).
  • LimonoidsLimonoids: Based on animal research, dill apiol may have synergistic antimalarial effects with the limonoid gedunin (68).
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on animal study, the dill constituent carvone may cause depressant effects, such as a decrease in the response to touch and ambulation, and an increase in sedation, palpebral ptosis, and antinociceptive effects (3).
  • Thyroid agentsThyroid agents: In animal study, an extract of Anethum graveolens L. reversed the dexamethasone-induced decrease in thyroid hormones (5).

Dill/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Dill/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood glucoseBlood glucose: Based on animal study, administration of dill extract may result in significant reductions in glucose levels (19; 5).
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: Based on animal and human study, administration of dill extract may result in significant reductions in total cholesterol, LDL, and VLDL levels (19; 71). However, in one clinical study, dill raised triglycerides (2).
  • Thyroid hormonesThyroid hormones: In animal study, an extract of Anethum graveolens L. reversed the dexamethasone-induced decrease in thyroid hormones (5).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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