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Celery (Apium graveolens)



Interactions

Celery/Drug Interactions:
  • ACE inhibitorsACE inhibitors: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of conversion enzyme inhibitors and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (29; 30).
  • AlcoholAlcohol: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of alcohol and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (29; 30).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Celery may have anticoagulant or antiplatelet activity.
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: According to secondary sources, celery has shown hypotensive activity in vivo and in humans.
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: Based on a series of three rat studies by the same researcher, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in the celery-treated rats (52; 53; 24). However, based one of the studies, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (52).
  • Antispasmodic agentsAntispasmodic agents: Celery may have antispasmodic activity.
  • AspirinAspirin: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of aspirin and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (29; 30).
  • Beta blockersBeta blockers: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of beta blockers and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (29; 30).
  • Cytochrome P450 metabolized agentsCytochrome P450 metabolized agents: Based on a rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (52).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Celery may have diuretic properties.
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on a mouse study, 3, n-butylphthalide and sedanenolide isolated from celery oil showed weak sedative activity, prolonged pentobarbital narcosis, and induced sleep immediately following recovery from a prior barbiturate treatment (54).

Celery/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Celery may have anticoagulant or antiplatelet activity.
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: According to secondary sources, celery has shown hypotensive activity in vivo and in humans.
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Based on a series of three rat studies by the same researcher, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in the celery-treated rats (52; 53; 24). However, based one of the studies, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (52).
  • AntispasmodicsAntispasmodics: Celery may have antispasmodic activity.
  • Cytochrome P450 metabolized herbs and supplementsCytochrome P450 metabolized herbs and supplements: Based on a rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (52).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Celery may have diuretic properties.
  • SedativesSedatives: Celery may have sedative properties.
  • Willow barkWillow bark: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of aspirin and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (29; 30). Aspirin is based on willow bark extract.

Celery/Food Interactions:
  • Apiaceae/Umbelliferae plantsApiaceae/Umbelliferae plants: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as Umbelliferae plants and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).
  • CarrotCarrot: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as carrot and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (12; 15).
  • DillDill: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as dill and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).
  • FigFig: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as fig and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (12).
  • GrassGrass: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as some natural grasses and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (18).
  • LemonLemon: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as lemons and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (12; 19; 15).
  • LimeLime: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as limes and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (12; 19; 15; 18).
  • Moraceae plants (mulberry family)Moraceae plants (mulberry family): According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as Moracea plants and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).
  • OrangesOranges: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as oranges and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15; 18).
  • ParsleyParsley: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as parsley and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (12; 15).
  • ParsnipParsnip: According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as parsnip and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).
  • Rutaceae plants (including Citrus)Rutaceae plants (including Citrus): According to case reports, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as Rutaceae plants and celery, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).

Celery/Lab Interactions:
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Celery may have anticoagulant or antiplatelet activity.
  • Lipid panelLipid panel: Based on a series of three rat studies by the same researcher, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in the celery-treated rats (52; 53; 24). However, based one of the studies, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (52).
  • Serum IgE levelsSerum IgE levels: Based on case reports and human study, celery may cause IgE levels to increase in patients hypersensitive to celery (6; 7; 8; 9; 10).
  • Serum levels of cytochrome P450 metabolized drugs, herbs, or supplementsSerum levels of cytochrome P450 metabolized drugs, herbs, or supplements: Based on a rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (52).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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