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Arsenicum album



Interactions

Arsenicum album/Drug Interactions:
  • AntidiabeticsAntidiabetics: In humans, Arsenicum album (A-a) has been reported to normalize elevated glucose levels in some subjects suspected to have arsenic poisoning (2). The effects with antidiabetic agents are not well understood.
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Actinomycin-D has been reported to reduce the protective effect of Arsenicum album against arsenic toxicity in mice (8).
  • Arsenic poisoning antidotesArsenic poisoning antidotes: In humans, administration of A-a to subjects with suspected arsenic poisoning resulted in reduced antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers and blood levels of arsenic, and raised red blood cell counts and urine arsenic levels in some subjects (2; 3).
  • BenzodiazepinesBenzodiazepines: In humans, Arsenicum album has been reported to reduce anxiety in a single subject (1). Theoretically, concurrent use of Arsenicum album and antianxiety agents may have additive effects.

Arsenicum album/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Actinomycin-D has been reported to reduce the protective effect of Arsenicum album against arsenic toxicity in mice (8).
  • Arsenic poisoning antidotesArsenic poisoning antidotes: In humans, administration of A-a to subjects with suspected arsenic poisoning resulted in reduced antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers and blood levels of arsenic, and raised red blood cell counts and urine arsenic levels in some subjects (2; 3).
  • Essential oilsEssential oils: Unsubstantiated and anecdotal reports have recommended that some essential oils, such as rosemary, thyme, camphor, mint, eucalyptus, and lavender (solution >2%), be avoided during treatments.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: In humans, A-a has been reported to normalize elevated glucose levels in some subjects suspected to have arsenic poisoning (2). The effects with hypoglycemic agents are not well understood.
  • MintMint: Unsubstantiated and anecdotal reports suggest that usage of mint (including mint toothpaste and gum) be avoided when taking A-a.
  • SedativesSedatives: In humans, A-a has been reported to reduce anxiety in a single subject (1). Theoretically, concurrent use of Arsenicum album and antianxiety agents may have additive effects.

Arsenicum album/Food Interactions:
  • Unsubstantiated and anecdotal reports have suggested not taking A-a within 30 minutes of ingesting any food or liquids, and they have recommended avoidance of caffeine, coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods.

Arsenicum album/Lab Interactions:
  • Antinuclear antibody (ANA) measurementsAntinuclear antibody (ANA) measurements: A-a may ameliorate elevated ANA titers in suspected human arsenic poisoning (2).
  • Arsenic levels, serum and urineArsenic levels, serum and urine: In human studies of suspected arsenic poisoning, A-a has been reported to increase urine arsenic concentration and decrease blood arsenic levels (3).
  • Chromosomal abnormalitiesChromosomal abnormalities: A-a has been reported to reduce arsenic-induced chromosomal and sperm head abnormalities in animal studies (4).
  • DNA and RNA levels in organsDNA and RNA levels in organs: In mice administered arsenic, treatment with A-a was reported to increase liver and testes DNA and RNA (5).
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR): In human studies, A-a has been reported to reduce elevated ESR in some subjects suspected to have arsenic poisoning (2).
  • Glucose levelsGlucose levels: In human studies, A-a has been reported to normalize elevated glucose levels in some subjects suspected to have arsenic poisoning (2).
  • Glutathione levelsGlutathione levels: A-a has been reported to increase reduced glutathione levels in some human subjects with suspected arsenic poisoning (3).
  • Phosphatase levelsPhosphatase levels: A decrease in elevated levels of phosphatases was reported after administration of A-a in humans suspected to have arsenic poisoning (3). In mice given arsenic, A-a was reported to reduce phosphatase levels (6).
  • Red blood cell countsRed blood cell counts: A-a has been reported to increase red cell counts in humans with suspected arsenic poisoning (2).
  • Transaminase levelsTransaminase levels: A-a has been reported to reduce elevated transaminase levels in subjects suspected to have arsenic poisoning (3) and in mice administered arsenic (6).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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