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Acidophilus (Lactobacillus acidophilus)



Interactions

L. acidophilus/Drug Interactions:
  • AlcoholAlcohol: Some natural medicine practitioners maintain that Lactobacilli are negatively affected by alcohol and that alcohol should not be taken concurrently with Lactobacilli supplementation.
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Some natural medicine practitioners believe that L. acidophilus should be taken 2-3 hours after an antibiotic dose to prevent the killing of L. acidophilus. L. acidophilus may also interfere with the metabolism of sulfasalazine, chloramphenicol, and palmitate by degrading them in the stomach, if taken concurrently in humans (36). According to a clinical trial, antibiotics may also kill resident L. acidophilus in the vaginal flora and result in vaginitis, for which probiotic therapy has been used (61). According to another clinical trial, Lactobacilli may also alter how intestinal microflora respond to antibiotic therapy (90).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: Based on data from clinical trials, L. acidophilus may decrease blood lipids, including cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides (50; 91; 51). Theoretically, concurrent use of L. acidophilus and antilipemic agents may cause added cholesterol lowering.
  • ContraceptivesContraceptives: Based on clinical trial, larger counts of vaginal Lactobacilli may be associated with contraceptive vaginal ring use (92).
  • H2 blockersH2 blockers: Secondary sources have suggested that orally administered probiotics, either alive or lyophilized, might not survive gastric pH (1.0-2.5) in quantities sufficient to colonize the gut. This has raised questions as to whether patients should consider taking an acid-reducing agent 30-60 minutes prior to taking Lactobacillus. This hypothesis remains theoretical, with unknown clinical relevance, as supporting evidence in humans is currently lacking. Furthermore, clinical studies have shown that L. acidophilus may survive in an acid and bile environment (49).
  • Magnesium hydroxideMagnesium hydroxide: Secondary sources have suggested that orally administered probiotics, either alive or lyophilized, might not survive gastric pH (1.0-2.5) in quantities sufficient to colonize the gut. This has raised questions as to whether patients should consider taking an acid-reducing agent 30-60 minutes prior to taking Lactobacillus. This hypothesis remains theoretical, with unknown clinical relevance, as supporting evidence in humans is currently lacking. Furthermore, clinical studies have shown that L. acidophilus may survive in an acid and bile environment (49).
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): Secondary sources have suggested that orally administered probiotics, either alive or lyophilized, might not survive gastric pH (1.0-2.5) in quantities sufficient to colonize the gut. This has raised questions as to whether patients should consider taking an acid-reducing agent 30-60 minutes prior to taking Lactobacillus. This hypothesis remains theoretical, with unknown clinical relevance, as supporting evidence in humans is currently lacking. Furthermore, clinical studies have shown that L. acidophilus may survive in an acid and bile environment (49).
  • SulfonamidesSulfonamides: An isolated strain of L. acidophilus was shown to degrade sulfasalazine and phthalylsulphathiazole in vitro (93).
  • VaccinationsVaccinations: Clinical studies have shown L. acidophilus consumption to enhance immune response to vaccinations, including oral polio vaccine (OPV) (52), tetanus toxoid (TT), and Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) (69).

L. acidophilus/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Some natural medicine practitioners believe that L. acidophilus should be taken 2-3 hours after an antibiotic dose to prevent the killing of L. acidophilus. Antibiotics may also kill resident L. acidophilus in the vaginal flora and result in vaginitis, for which probiotic therapy has been used (61). Lactobacilli may also alter how intestinal microflora respond to antibiotic therapy (90).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Based on data from clinical trials, L. acidophilus may decrease blood lipids, including cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides (50; 91; 51).
  • Gastrointestinal herbs and supplementsGastrointestinal herbs and supplements: It has been suggested that orally administered probiotics, either alive or lyophilized, might not survive gastric pH (1.0-2.5) in quantities sufficient to colonize the gut. This has raised questions as to whether patients should consider taking an acid-reducing agent 30-60 minutes prior to taking Lactobacillus. This hypothesis remains theoretical, with unknown clinical relevance, as supporting evidence in humans is currently lacking. Furthermore, clinical studies have shown that L. acidophilus may survive in an acid and bile environment (49).
  • Phytic acidPhytic acid: Species of Lactobacillus may be inhibited by phytic acid, which is found in many plant products (particularly bran) (94).
  • PrebioticsPrebiotics: Short-chain carbohydrates, galactooligosaccharides (GOS), and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) have been shown to promote the growth of gut microflora (including Lactobacilli) (95).
  • ProbioticsProbiotics: In theory, other probiotics (such as L. casei and Saccharomyces boulardii) may have additive effects when used with L. acidophilus. Strains of Lactobacilli vary in their ability to adhere to the intestinal tissue. L. rhamnosus GG has demonstrated a 10-100 times greater adherence to human intestinal tissue as compared to L. acidophilus (96).

L. acidophilus/Food Interactions:
  • AlcoholAlcohol: Natural medicine practitioners believe that Lactobacilli are negatively affected by alcohol, and that alcohol should not be taken concurrently with Lactobacilli supplementation.
  • Low-oxalate dietLow-oxalate diet: Probiotic preparations containing L. acidophilus have been shown to moderate urinary oxalate excretion (97).
  • Phytic acidPhytic acid: Species of Lactobacillus may be inhibited by phytic acid, a form of phosphorus stored in many plant tissues (particularly bran) (94).
  • PrebioticsPrebiotics: Natural medicine practitioners believe that natural food sources of prebiotic oligosaccharides, such as fructooligosaccharides (FOS), found in bananas, Jerusalem artichokes, onions, asparagus, and garlic, may have a positive interaction on the effectiveness of Lactobacilli.
  • ProbioticsProbiotics: Sources of other probiotics, including fermented soy milk, may have additive effects on L. acidophilus (98).

L.acidophilus/Lab Interactions:
  • Ammonium ion testAmmonium ion test: L. acidophilus and other probiotic species have been shown to decrease fecal pH and ammonia levels in blood and feces (20).
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: Based on data from clinical trials, L. acidophilus may decrease blood lipids, including cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides (50; 91; 51).
  • VaccinationsVaccinations: Clinical studies have shown L. acidophilus consumption to enhance immune response to vaccinations, including oral polio vaccine (OPV) (52), tetanus toxoid (TT), and Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) (69).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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